Balancing Taste & Nutrition: Sodium Facts

   

Putting Sodium Levels into Perspective

The amount of sodium we need varies from individual to individual. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that individuals reduce daily sodium intake to less than 2,300 milligrams. The Guidelines also recommend a daily limit of 1,500 milligrams of sodium for people who are 51 and older and those of any age who are African American or have hypertension, diabetes or chronic kidney disease.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference provides detailed information on the nutritional content of thousands of food items. The database is free and available to the public.  Click here to learn about sodium content in thousands of foods and beverages.

For information on sodium levels in some everyday food items, see below.

Can of chicken soup (1 cup) Approx. 841 mg per serving

(source: USDA National Nutrient Database: Soup: NDB# 06419)
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At Nestlé, "Good Food, Good Life" is really thinking about what consumers' needs are

STOUFFER’S® Average sodium content 864 milligrams per serving

LEAN CUISINE® Average sodium content 600 milligrams per serving

HOT POCKETS® Average sodium content 590 milligrams per serving

LEAN POCKETS® Average sodium content 590 milligrams per serving

Sodium in Nestlé Prepared Foods

At Nestlé, our aim is simple:  create wholesome and delicious foods that contribute to healthy lifestyles. That’s what we mean by “Good Food, Good Life.”  For years, we have been steadily adjusting sodium levels across brands, while simultaneously improving the nutritional and taste profiles of our products.

The current average sodium content for our frozen entrées are as follows:

  • STOUFFER’S®:  864 milligrams per serving
  • LEAN CUISINE®:  600 milligrams per serving
  • HOT POCKETS®:  590 milligrams per serving
  • LEAN POCKETS®:  590 milligrams per serving

Our goal moving forward is to continue reducing the levels of sodium in our products gradually so that consumers can adapt easily and enjoyably.

Nestlé to Decrease Sodium 10% by 2015

In October 2010, Nestlé announced a comprehensive plan to decrease the sodium content in its products by 10 percent by the year 2015. This initiative includes the STOUFFER’S®, LEAN CUISINE®, BUITONI®, HOT POCKETS® and LEAN POCKETS® brands, which will undergo gradual but steady recipe changes in order to bring down sodium levels without impacting taste.

For years, Nestlé has been steadily adjusting sodium levels across brands, while simultaneously improving the nutritional and taste profiles of its products with the addition of high-quality ingredients. This stepwise approach is how Nestlé delivers convenient, nutritious and delicious foods that help families achieve their wellness goals. Get more information on Nestlé Prepared Foods Company’s plan to decrease sodium.

Sodium in Food

Sodium is commonly found in food and beverages, either as a naturally occurring element in an ingredient or as a component of seasoning added to enhance flavor.  When sodium is added to foods, it is most often in the form of table salt (sodium chloride).

Sodium is necessary for health because the body uses it to regulate fluids, blood pressure and nerve and muscle function.  To help maintain health, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest daily limits for sodium.

At Nestlé, we recognize that maintaining a healthy lifestyle requires making smart decisions about food.  We are committed to sharing nutritional knowledge that will help consumers make informed decisions about what they eat.

Our packaging clearly identifies the number of servings, providing consumers with an easy way to monitor and manage sodium intake as well as portion size.  In the near future, all Nestlé Prepared Food labels will feature front of pack labeling to further highlight key nutritional information.  Get more information on how Nestlé shares nutritional information for consumers.

For information about sodium and other nutritional components in food, search the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference